Tag: Christmas

The Story of Ebenezer Scrooge begins Nov. 24

A miserly old man named Ebenezer Scrooge sits in his counting-house on Christmas Eve. His clerk, Bob Cratchit, shivers in the anteroom because Scrooge refuses to spend money on heating coals for a fire. Scrooge’s nephew, Fred, pays his uncle a visit and invites him to his annual Christmas party. Scrooge spits the now infamous, “Bah!Humbug!” in response to his nephew’s “Merry Christmas!”

Later that evening, after returning to his dark, cold apartment, Scrooge receives a chilling visit from the ghost of his dead partner, Jacob Marley. Marley, looking haggard and pallid, relates his unfortunate story. As punishment for his greedy and self-serving life, his spirit has been condemned to wander the Earth, weighted down with heavy chains. Marley informs Scrooge that three spirits will visit him during each of the next three nights. After the wraith disappears, Scrooge collapses into a deep sleep.

He wakes moments before the arrival of the Ghost of Christmas Past, a strange childlike phantom with a brightly glowing head. The spirit escorts Scrooge on a journey into the past to previous Christmases from the curmudgeon’s earlier years. Invisible to those he watches, Scrooge revisits his childhood school days, his apprenticeship with a jolly merchant named Fezziwig, and his engagement to Belle, a woman who leaves Scrooge because his lust for money eclipses his ability to love another. Scrooge, deeply moved, sheds tears of regret before the phantom returns him to his bed.

The Ghost of Christmas Present, a majestic giant clad in a green fur robe, takes Scrooge through London to unveil Christmas as it will happen that year. Scrooge watches the large, bustling Cratchit family prepare a miniature feast in their meager home. He discovers Bob Cratchit’s crippled son, Tiny Tim, a courageous boy whose kindness and humility warms Scrooge’s heart. The specter then zips Scrooge to his nephew’s to witness the Christmas party. Toward the end of the day, he shows Scrooge two starved children, Ignorance and Want, living under his coat. He vanishes instantly as Scrooge notices a dark, hooded figure coming toward him.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come leads Scrooge through a sequence of mysterious scenes relating to an unnamed man’s recent death. Scrooge sees businessmen discussing the dead man’s riches, some vagabonds trading his personal effects for cash, and a poor couple expressing relief at the death of their unforgiving creditor. Scrooge, anxious to learn the lesson of his latest visitor, begs to know the name of the dead man. After pleading with the ghost, Scrooge finds himself in a churchyard, the spirit pointing to a grave. Scrooge looks at the headstone and is shocked to read his own name. He desperately implores the spirit to alter his fate, promising to renounce his insensitive, avaricious ways and to honor Christmas with all his heart when he suddenly finds himself safely tucked in his bed.

Overwhelmed with joy by the chance to redeem himself and grateful that he has been returned to Christmas Day, Scrooge rushes out onto the street hoping to share his newfound Christmas spirit. He sends a giant Christmas turkey to the Cratchit house and attends Fred’s party. As the years go by, he holds true to his promise and honors Christmas with all his heart.

An Original Experience Fueled with Tastes of Christmas Past

Hedgerow Theatre continues its holiday tradition with its 25th annual production of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, which runs from November 24 to December 24, with Artistic Director Jared Reed at the helm.

A miserly old man named Ebenezer Scrooge sits in his counting-house on Christmas Eve. His clerk, Bob Cratchit, shivers in the anteroom because Scrooge refuses to spend money on heating coals for a fire. Later that evening, after returning to his dark, cold apartment, Scrooge receives a chilling visit from the ghost of his dead partner, Jacob Marley. Marley, looking haggard and pallid, relates his unfortunate story. As punishment for his greedy and self-serving life, his spirit has been condemned to wander the Earth weighted down with heavy chains. Marley informs Scrooge that three spirits will visit him during each of the next three nights. After the wraith disappears, Scrooge collapses into a deep sleep.

Reed has directed the production for the previous two seasons, as well as serving as adaptor and designer. His adaptation remains faithful to Dickens’ tale of the redemption of Ebenezer Scrooge, a miserable, selfish miser whose heart is transformed after he is visited by a series of spirits on Christmas Eve.

“I began to revisit it after I did my one-man show based on Dickens’ reading version, so I decided to to go back to the source material. The dialogue is all true to the original, and the cast will still sing Christmas carols throughout the show.”

Scrooge wakes moments before the arrival of the Ghost of Christmas Past, a strange childlike phantom with a brightly glowing head. The spirit escorts Scrooge on a journey into the past to previous Christmases from the curmudgeon’s earlier years. The Ghost of Christmas Present, a majestic giant clad in a green fur robe, takes Scrooge through London to unveil Christmas as it will happen that year.The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come leads Scrooge through a sequence of mysterious scenes relating to an unnamed man’s recent death.

“The set and basic story will all be familiar,” he confirmed “because it’s a classic just as it is. It isn’t a rewrite, per se, just a script that better suits our company.”

After pleading with the ghost, Scrooge finds himself in a churchyard, the spirit pointing to a grave. Scrooge looks at the headstone and is shocked to read his own name. He desperately implores the spirit to alter his fate, promising to renounce his insensitive, avaricious ways and to honor Christmas with all his heart when he suddenly finds himself safely tucked in his bed. Overwhelmed with joy by the chance to redeem himself and grateful that he has been returned to Christmas Day, Scrooge rushes out onto the street hoping to share his newfound Christmas spirit.

Because of a large number of performances, there are teams of actors to accommodate their schedules and to allow them to play different parts to enhance their experience. Scrooge will be portrayed in all shows by Hedgerow veteran and perennial favorite Zoran Kovcic.

There are still a few dates available to book special performances for schools or other groups. To arrange a time, contact Group Sales Director Art Hunter at 610-565-4211.

Adult ticket prices are $35, with a $3 discount for seniors. Tickets for those ages 30 and under, as well as for students, are $20. For groups of 10 or more, tickets are $18. Prices include all fees and are subject to change. For reservations or more info, call 610-565-4211 or visit www.HedgerowTheatre.org. Hedgerow Theatre is located at 64 Rose Valley Road in Rose Valley (near Media).

25th Annual Christmas Carol Begins November 24

Carve up the turkey, plan those online shopping deals, and get ready for the most magical time of the year at Hedgerow Theatre. On November 24, Hedgerow Theatre kicks off its 25th annual Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

“A Christmas Carol is a timeless story of the redemption of a man to his better self – we choose to shut ourselves off from our humanity, and we can choose to embrace it,” said adaptor and director Jared Reed.

Professional Actors are joined by over 32 members of our community to make Hedgerow Theatre’s Charles Dicken’s A Christmas Carol a part of the Holidays you cannot miss. Decked with all your favorite Christmas carols, in our 1800s grist mill theatre, the Hedgerow experience is one that you will never forget.

“Hedgerow has a long history of performing Dickens – 25 years of A Christmas Carol, and numerous productions of his other stories such as Oliver – and the theatre itself, an 1840’s grist mill, is perfect for Dickens and creating a Victorian London.”

Dickens’ story was first published in London on December 19,1843 and the first edition sold out by Christmas Eve. A Christmas Carol tells the story of Ebenezer Scrooge, an old miser, who is visited by the ghost of his former business partner, Jacob Marley, and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come.

Dickens captured the zeitgeist of the mid-Victorian revival of the Christmas holiday. He  influenced the modern Western observance of Christmas and inspired several aspects of Christmas, such as family gatherings, seasonal food and drink, dancing, games and a festive generosity of spirit.

“Hedgerow prides itself on telling great stories. We have been bringing people together to share in the power of an ensemble troupe of actors performing for an engaged audience since 1923.  A Christmas Carol is who we strive to be all year round.”

Relive the transformation of Ebenezer Scrooge, laugh with all the Cratchits, and journey through space and time with the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come as merriment and mirth fill your heart with joy.

The first performance of A Christmas Carol is Friday, November 24, at 7:30 p.m. There will be Wednesday matinees on December 13 and 20, at 2 p.m., as well as special performances Monday 18, Tuesday 19, and Wednesday 20 at 7:30 p.m.

Adult ticket prices are $35, with a $3 discount for seniors. Tickets for those ages 30 and under, as well as for students, are $20. For groups of 10 or more, tickets are $18. Prices include all fees and are subject to change. For reservations or more info, call 610-565-4211 or visit www.HedgerowTheatre.org. Hedgerow Theatre is located at 64 Rose Valley Road in Rose Valley (near Media).

 

The Story of A Christmas Carol

Twenty-five years ago Hedgerow Theatre began telling one of the most timeless stories ever written: Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. 

A miserly old man named Ebenezer Scrooge sits in his counting-house on Christmas Eve. His clerk, Bob Cratchit, shivers in the anteroom because Scrooge refuses to spend money on heating coals for a fire. Scrooge’s nephew, Fred, pays his uncle a visit and invites him to his annual Christmas party. Scrooge spits the now infamous, “Bah!Humbug!” in response to his nephew’s “Merry Christmas!”

Later that evening, after returning to his dark, cold apartment, Scrooge receives a chilling visit from the ghost of his dead partner, Jacob Marley. Marley, looking haggard and pallid, relates his unfortunate story. As punishment for his greedy and self-serving life, his spirit has been condemned to wander the Earth, weighted down with heavy chains. Marley informs Scrooge that three spirits will visit him during each of the next three nights. After the wraith disappears, Scrooge collapses into a deep sleep.

He wakes moments before the arrival of the Ghost of Christmas Past, a strange childlike phantom with a brightly glowing head. The spirit escorts Scrooge on a journey into the past to previous Christmases from the curmudgeon’s earlier years. Invisible to those he watches, Scrooge revisits his childhood school days, his apprenticeship with a jolly merchant named Fezziwig, and his engagement to Belle, a woman who leaves Scrooge because his lust for money eclipses his ability to love another. Scrooge, deeply moved, sheds tears of regret before the phantom returns him to his bed.

The Ghost of Christmas Present, a majestic giant clad in a green fur robe, takes Scrooge through London to unveil Christmas as it will happen that year. Scrooge watches the large, bustling Cratchit family prepare a miniature feast in their meager home. He discovers Bob Cratchit’s crippled son, Tiny Tim, a courageous boy whose kindness and humility warms Scrooge’s heart. The specter then zips Scrooge to his nephew’s to witness the Christmas party. Toward the end of the day, he shows Scrooge two starved children, Ignorance and Want, living under his coat. He vanishes instantly as Scrooge notices a dark, hooded figure coming toward him.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come leads Scrooge through a sequence of mysterious scenes relating to an unnamed man’s recent death. Scrooge sees businessmen discussing the dead man’s riches, some vagabonds trading his personal effects for cash, and a poor couple expressing relief at the death of their unforgiving creditor. Scrooge, anxious to learn the lesson of his latest visitor, begs to know the name of the dead man. After pleading with the ghost, Scrooge finds himself in a churchyard, the spirit pointing to a grave. Scrooge looks at the headstone and is shocked to read his own name. He desperately implores the spirit to alter his fate, promising to renounce his insensitive, avaricious ways and to honor Christmas with all his heart when he suddenly finds himself safely tucked in his bed.

Overwhelmed with joy by the chance to redeem himself and grateful that he has been returned to Christmas Day, Scrooge rushes out onto the street hoping to share his newfound Christmas spirit. He sends a giant Christmas turkey to the Cratchit house and attends Fred’s party. As the years go by, he holds true to his promise and honors Christmas with all his heart.

This year marks teh 25th Anniversary of Hedgerow’s production with Producing Artistic Director Jared Reed adapting and directing Dickens’ masterful holiday tale. Shows begin November 24 and run through December 24.

Merry Christmas Week

Here at Hedgerow we celebrate Christmas all month long; even today, we have schools coming in to celebrate the season with Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. For the past 24 years, this story has tied us together with friends, family, and community.

Just like Scrooge, each year we look back at our past, examine our present, and prepare for the future.

We know exactly where we came from, the spark of creativity from Jasper Deeter,the ashes of a devastating fire that could not stop the intrepid Hedgerow theatre, and the amazing leadership of Penelope Reed who guided us into a new era.

We examine our present with Jared Reed at the helm the Company, as well as this authentic production of A Christmas Carol he wrote and directed after the success of his one man show: Dickens’ A Christmas Carol.

We prepare for the exciting year to come with shows like The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Part 2, Uncle Vanya, The Prisoner of Zenda, and (news drop) Around the World in 80 Days, bringing our patrons the best, most original Hedgerow season in years.

From our inception Hedgerow has been about bringing actor and audience together in an intimate setting. We take pride in creating every aspect of the story each patron sees, as we build the creative team, the set, the sound, and every part of the show from the ground up.

This past year we brought our audience an intergalactic odyssey with Hitchhikers, a regional premiere with the Barrymore Recommended production of Or, a world premiere Agatha Christie production, and a zany romp of zannis with The Servant of Two Masters. 

Along with these original plays, we toasted the summer Farce and gas lit our theatre with Boeing Boeing and Angel Street. Hedgerow has stayed true to its mission, and continues to bring relevant, amazing works of art to the tiny grist mill.

This is the final week Dickens’ tale, but we are excited for the season to come. Enjoy this Christmas week, and all the joy Christmas can bring: the Holiday parties, the family gatherings, the delayed travel schedules, all of it.

Merry Christmas.

Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

 

 

 

A Christmas Carol

by Charles Dickens, adapted by Jared Reed

November 24 to December 24

There will be one 10 minute intermission

This show runs approximately 90 minutes

TICKETS AND TIMES 

Twenty-five years ago a Delaware Valley tradition began at Hedgerow Theatre: the annual production of Charles Dickens’ timeless A Christmas Carol. 

Professional Actors are joined by over 60 members of our community to make Hedgerow Theatre’s Charles Dicken’s A Christmas Carol a part of the Holidays you cannot miss. Decked with all your favorite Christmas carols in our 1800s grist mill theatre, the Hedgerow experience is one that you will never forget. 

Relive the transformation of Ebenezer Scrooge, laugh with all the Cratchitts, and journey through space and time with the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Yet to Come as merriment and mirth fills your heart with joy.

“A family tradition for 20 years.”

“Its just not Christmas until we come to Hedgerow.”

Meet the Author

British novelist Charles Dickens was born on February 7, 1812, in Portsmouth, England. Over the course of his writing career, he wrote the beloved classic novels Oliver Twist, A Christmas CarolNicholas Nickleby, David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities and Great Expectations. On June 9, 1870, Dickens died of a stroke in Kent, England, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

His own story is one of rags to riches. He was born in Portsmouth on 7 February 1812, to John and Elizabeth Dickens. The good fortune of being sent to school at the age of nine was short-lived because his father, inspiration for the character of Mr. Micawber in ‘David Copperfield’, was imprisoned for bad debt. The entire family, apart from Charles, were sent to Marshalsea along with their patriarch. Charles was sent to work in Warren’s blacking factory and endured appalling conditions as well as loneliness and despair. After three years he was returned to school, but the experience was never forgotten and became fictionalized in two of his better-known novels ‘David Copperfield’ and ‘Great Expectations’. 

A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost-Story of Christmas, commonly known as A Christmas Carol, is a novella by Charles Dickens, first published in London by Chapman & Hall in 1843. A Christmas Carol tells the story of Ebenezer Scrooge, an old miser who is visited by the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come. After their visits, Scrooge is transformed into a kinder, gentler man.

Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol at a time when the British were examining and exploring Christmas traditions from the past, such as carols, as well as new customs such as Christmas trees. He was influenced by experiences from his own past, and from the Christmas stories of other authors, including Washington Irving and Douglas Jerrold.

Published on 19 December, the first edition sold out by Christmas Eve; by the end of 1844 thirteen editions had been released. Most critics reviewed the novella positively. The story was illicitly copied in January 1844; Dickens took action against the publishers, who went bankrupt, reducing further Dickens’s small profits from the publication. He went on to write four other Christmas stories in subsequent years. In 1849 he began public readings of the story which proved so successful he undertook 127 further performances until 1870, the year of his death. A Christmas Carol has never been out of print and has been translated into several languages; the story has been adapted many times for film, stage, opera and other media.

With A Christmas Carol, Dickens captured the zeitgeist of the mid-Victorian revival of the Christmas holiday. He has been acknowledged as an influence on the modern Western observance of Christmas and inspired several aspects of Christmas, such as family gatherings, seasonal food and drink, dancing, games and a festive generosity of spirit.

Meet the Actors

Meet the Cast of A Christmas Carol

Stacy Skinner is a Hedgerow pro. She has been seen in Hamlet, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, and for several years Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. She is also one of the best people you could ever meet. Today, get to know one of the best actors Hedgerow has ever had:
1) Why do you enjoy doing A Christmas Carol?
What better way to spend December than steeped in this beautiful story of hope and redemption? While everyone around me is scurrying around to prepare for the holiday, I am feasting on the delicious words of Dickens and sharing them with school students, folks in our community, and the other artists with which I get to “play in the Hedgerows”. This is my fifth year being a part of Hedgerow’s A Christmas Carol. It has become my holiday tradition, spending this season with the Hedgerow company and the beautifully crafted characters of Dickens. I have a much loved family of my own, mind you, but they have indulged my yearly desire to spend a great deal of December in Victorian England!
2) Why do you think people enjoy Charles Dickens?
At our core, there is so much of the human experience that we share that transcends culture and even time. Dickens speaks to that sameness, in the way that Shakespeare did, and in the way many a great writer does whose work endures. This quote, I think, sums it up well:
“We read Dickens not just because he was a man of his own times, but because he was a man for our times as well. We read Dickens because his perception and investigation of the human psyche is deep, precise, and illuminating, and because he tells us things about ourselves by portraying personality traits and habits that might seem all too familiar. His messages about poverty and charity have traveled through decades, and we can learn from the experiences of his characters almost as easily as we can learn from our own experiences.” Jon Michael Varese
3) What is your favorite part of doing this story?
I will answer that by sharing one of my favorite passages of the story, which as a narrator I spoke in years past but which a version of is now spoken by Scrooge: “Much they saw and far they went and many homes they visited. The Spirit stood beside sick beds, and they were cheerful; on foreign lands, and they were close to home; by struggling men, and they were patient in their greater hopes; by poverty, and it was rich.”  What these lines communicate is so rich, helping me to re-adjust my own heart and find perspective. There were some lines in Hamlet that also struck a cord within me every time I heard them. To have such powerful language with which to make theatre, there is nothing like it!
4) Who do you play in the piece? Which is your favorite part? Why
Every year my main character has been one of the narrators, or storytellers as I prefer to call them. Most years I have also played the solicitor and other minor characters. This year, for the first time, I am playing Mrs. Cratchit and Caroline, which is a great treat for me. Although I love the opportunity to play different characters, narrating is really my favorite part. It feels like I have this gift to give the audience, helping to unfold this story for them, and I really enjoy that. It also reminds me of the many, many hours of reading aloud to both of my now grown sons, being the main storyteller in their lives. And isn’t sharing great stories what theatre is all about?

Meet the Cast of A Christmas Carol

Allison Bloechl is a company member of Hedgerow Theatre who has appeared in Gaslight, Dracula, Bullshot Crummond and many more shows. She is also the Box Office Manager at Hedgerow, as well as a registered Actor Combatant. This year will be her third year doing Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. 
1) Why do you enjoy doing A Christmas Carol?
It’s a beautiful story with beautiful language that means a lot to people at Christmas time.
2) Why do you think people enjoy Charles Dickens?
His language is really beautiful and ornate, but I particularly like his dry wit.
3) What is your favorite part of doing this story?
It’s really nice to see everyone coming together to tell the story.  I love singing a lot of the classic Christmas Carols we incorporate into the story.
4) Who do you play in the piece? Which is your favorite part? Why
I play three characters this year, Belle, Mrs. Fred and the Charwoman.  Mrs. Fred is always my favorite, even though it’s not a very large role.  The world of Fred’s party scene is so filled with joy and love that it’s a treat to spend a few minutes in it every day.

Christmas Carol Has, Like, A Lot of Costumes

For 24 years Hedgerow as brought the community on stage and somehow found cloths for them all. From Cathy Baum to Elizabeth Hanson, these designers have pulled from The Walnut Street Theatre to the McCarter to find the perfect Dickensian costumes. With people of all shapes and sizes filling out Dickens’ London, it takes a lot of work and a lot of prep to make the actors look good. This year, Elizabeth takes on the task yet again to bring Scrooge and crew to life.

Elizabeth Hanson (costume designer) Elizabeth entered Drexel University with the intention of becoming a fashion designer. Life had other plans and after earning a BA in Communications from Temple University and an MBA from Widener University she had a varied 35+ year career in advertising and higher education marketing. During that time she continued to design and sew clothing, costumes, prom and wedding gowns for private clients and family. Three years ago Elizabeth connected with Hedgerow and for the past two years has been serving as resident designer and costume shop manager. She did costumes for children’s productions at Hedgerow including Godspell, Secret Garden. Hairspray, Charlotte’s Web and Oliver and has assisted with main stage productions including Boeing Boeing and OR. She is very happy to be part of this A Christmas Carol production.